• Gratis verzending vanaf €30 (daaronder €2,95)
    • Voor 15.30 uur besteld, dezelfde dag verzonden
    • Zorgvuldig verpakt
    • Gratis retourneren
  • 9.6 ★★★★★ (4092)
    • No products in the cart.

Gratis verzending vanaf €30 (daaronder €2,95)
038 - 467 34 00

Gratis verzending vanaf €30 (daaronder €2,95)
Voor 15.30 uur besteld, dezelfde dag verzonden
Zorgvuldig verpakt
Gratis retourneren

  • Specificaties
    Format

    22 x 26 cm

    Design

    Afra Dijkstra

    Number of pages

    160

    Illustrations

    100 images in colour and black and white

    ISBN

    9789462586154

    Language

    English

    Cooperation

    In collaboration with NIOD

    Year

    2024

  • No one was supposed to find Sobibor ever again. In 1943, when the Nazis shut down the death camp, they destroyed the gas chambers. To cover up pits where they buried their victims’ ashes, they planted trees.

    But their attempt to totally erase the camp failed. The marshy ground in an Eastern Polish river valley still held the victims’ last possessions, rusty and buried beneath the soil.  From 2007 on, archaeologists dug up tens of thousands of objects on the former camp terrain. Traces in the ground showed the ‘road to heaven’ the prisoners had been forced to walk. In deep pits, the archaeologists discovered the ashes of the dead.

    For decades on end, the ground in this wide forest had concealed the traces of mass murder. Sobibor was one of the Holocaust’s forgotten places, a ghost image that existed only in the nightmares of eyewitnesses and their descendants. But as the development of a new memorial site progressed, the camp’s remnants were laid bare.

    The excavations took place at a time when Holocaust tourism in Poland took off and a long-ignored past became a wedge deeply dividing Polish society. The question of what should be done with the traces of Sobibor led to harsh confrontations. In the meantime, the archaeologists kept digging, day after day. Spade by spade, they uncovered an unspeakable history.

     Erik Schumacher is an author and researcher. His works include the Jewish dual biography Mau en Gerty, and two parts of the NIOD series Leven in bezet Nederland.


Specificaties
Format

22 x 26 cm

Design

Afra Dijkstra

Number of pages

160

Illustrations

100 images in colour and black and white

ISBN

9789462586154

Language

English

Cooperation

In collaboration with NIOD

Year

2024


In het kort

No one was supposed to find Sobibor ever again. In 1943, when the Nazis shut down the death camp, they destroyed the gas chambers. To cover up pits where they buried their victims’ ashes, they planted trees.

But their attempt to totally erase the camp failed. The marshy ground in an Eastern Polish river valley still held the victims’ last possessions, rusty and buried beneath the soil.  From 2007 on, archaeologists dug up tens of thousands of objects on the former camp terrain. Traces in the ground showed the ‘road to heaven’ the prisoners had been forced to walk. In deep pits, the archaeologists discovered the ashes of the dead.